The Moon to Admire (Tsukimi). “47 Ronin of Ako” Serie. 2019.
Black iron-gall ink on colored paper.

11.7″x8.3″ (29.7× 21 cm) each / 11.7″x16.5″ (21×42 cm) whole. Single composition continued on two original artworks. The diptych paintings may be hung close together as a pair with a gap in between, attached together, or mounted in a single frame.

 

The Moon to Admire (Tsukimi). Diptych.

Three Moons. “47 Ronin of Ako” Serie. 2019.
Black iron-gall ink, white paint on colored paper.

11.7″x8.3″ (29.7×21 cm) each / 11.7″x24.9″ (21×63 cm) whole. Single composition continued on three original artworks. The triptych paintings may be hung close together as a pair with a gap in between, attached together, or mounted in a single frame.

 

Three Moons. Triptych.

Wind and Flow II. “47 Ronin of Ako” Serie. 2019.
Black iron-gall ink, white paint on colored paper.

11.7″x8.3″ (29.7× 21 cm) each / 11.7″x16.5″ (21×42 cm) whole. Single composition continued on two original artworks. The diptych paintings may be hung close together as a pair with a gap in between, attached together, or mounted in a single frame.

 

Flowers Of Th Battle. Diptych.

Wind and Flow II. “47 Ronin of Ako” Serie. 2019.
Black iron-gall ink, white paint on colored paper.

11.7″x8.3″ (29.7× 21 cm) each / 11.7″x16.5″ (21×42 cm) whole. Single composition continued on two original artworks. The diptych paintings may be hung close together as a pair with a gap in between, attached together, or mounted in a single frame.

 

Wind and Flow II. Diptych.


Wind and Flow. “47 Ronin of Ako” Serie. 2018.
Black iron-gall ink on colored paper.
11.7″x8.3″ (29.7×21 cm)

The revenge of the forty-seven samurai, also known as the Ako incident or Ako vendetta, is an 18th-century historical event in Japan in which a band of leaderless samurai avenged the death of their master. The incident has since become legendary.

 

Wind and Flow.

Ōishi Yoshio Kuranosuke
First of “47 Ronin of Ako” Serie. Ōishi Yoshio Kuranosuke. 2018.
Black iron-gall ink on colored paper.
11.7″x8.3″ (29.7×21 cm)

Ōishi Yoshio was the chamberlain of the Ako Domain in Harima Province, Japan (1679 – 1701). He is often referred to by his title, Ōishi Kuranosuke. Also he is known as the chief of the famous forty-seven Ronin of Ako in their 1702 vendetta. Kuranosuke displayed of true samurai ethics in the story of the 47 Ronin. It is believed that Kuranosuke’s last poem read, “My Lord’s life is as great as a mountain. My life, however, is as light and trivial as a piece of hair.” Yoshio stands holding a spear (yari) and striking a hira-daiko – a shallow drum with the head tacked into place – with a drum stick (bachi).

 

Ōishi Yoshio Kuranosuke